Don’t Call It A Comeback

I sat at the screen two years ago and felt like a screenwriter who kept pushing the same idea. Boy has Autism. Boy is loved. Boy succeeds. There is only so many times you can write the same script before it’s time to move on.

Yes. It’s Christmas Day and the house is a disaster!

So I did. I felt like in the world of Covid that there were so many at home that building an audience in a different avenue would be the perfect challenge as I stayed in my house like the rest of the world. I mean, my gym was closed, my classroom was closed, and life in general was just closed.

With that amount of time, you start to go a tad bit stir crazy. So I took my blog and turned it into a Podcast. Anyone who knows me, knows that I truly never stop talking. Quite frankly, nobody loves to hear their voice more than yours truly.

So that’s what I did. 13 episodes that ran just over a year. It was me talking to others about Autism. Whether it be parents or connected to special needs, that’s what I did. And I absolutely loved it.

However, like my blog, I ran into a circle. I struggled to branch out. I struggled building an audience. I struggled creating content. Ultimately, I lost sight of what I wanted to accomplish back when I started writing. I stopped telling the story of Sawyer.

For those who never read anything about Sawyer, he is my lovable, thoughtful, and charismatic soon to be 11 year Autistic son. I wrote and spoke of him as a running dialogue of his life through my eyes. It just so happened that I lost my way in going away from what I’m good at, which is telling his story from my perspective.

As I write this today, I have told zero people that I’m going to write anything. I didn’t even think about it until his recital a few weeks ago.

With that, I’m here to say that each Tuesday I will be posting a new piece of Sawyer. It’s time to get back to the basics. And with that, the comeback begins now.

-Autismdadinthe603

6 responses to “Don’t Call It A Comeback”

  1. Sawyer is an exceptional young man being raised by exceptional people. You honor him with your beautiful way with words while gifting us with his story. I can’t wait to read every week!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You will never regret logging your daily grind raising an autistic son. I could go back and read my journals if I want to remember. But I didn’t journal regularly, so many of the happenings didn’t get recorded.
    It’s scary times having a kid in Junior High or at least close to it.
    Do the writing for YOU. It helps.
    My son is 29. He is still looking for a job. I worry about him, but it’s not the same anymore.

    Congratulations on continuing your blog. I will have to check out your podcast.

    Happy New Year.
    Teri

    Liked by 1 person

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